Three Bottles

Our Own Brand of Naked Dream-Telling

I always believed that whatever had to be written would somehow get itself written.

—Seamus Heaney (via nprfreshair)

nprfreshair:

Okay, it’s snacktime!
Take a look at the snacks of literary masters.
(Michael Pollan is my favorite… roasted almonds for bears)

via F*ckyeahcharts 

I’d like to think of myself as an Emily Dickinson, but I am more of a John Steinbeck.  —Claire

nprfreshair:

Okay, it’s snacktime!

Take a look at the snacks of literary masters.

(Michael Pollan is my favorite… roasted almonds for bears)

via F*ckyeahcharts

I’d like to think of myself as an Emily Dickinson, but I am more of a John Steinbeck.  —Claire

wnyc:

soundcheckradio:

"I encourage young artists out there to collaborate with each other all the time. Bands constantly come to us for advice — young artists, aspiring artists, singers, writers, etc. — and I always say now, the best thing you can do is go and collaborate with someone else, because you are broadening your horizon right away. Instantly you are learning from someone else, and I think that that’s the best way to become a good writer."

Tegan Quin, of Tegan and Sara, on the benefits of collaboration.

Hear the fizzy synth pop duo Tegan and Sara perform in the Soundcheck studio.

(All photos by Michael Katzif/WNYC)

Tegan and Sara sound great in the studio today.

Love how this applies to writing. Gonna try and take to heart.

theparisreview:

It was important on this April nightto open the windows, all of them, eastand on the west, pushing the panesas high as they would go, to allowthe wind free passage through the rooms,to allow the night occupancyas if it were a word come into the bodyto render the bones definitive.
—Pattiann Rogers, from “God Alone”Photography Credit David Wilson

theparisreview:

It was important on this April night
to open the windows, all of them, east
and on the west, pushing the panes
as high as they would go, to allow
the wind free passage through the rooms,
to allow the night occupancy
as if it were a word come into the body
to render the bones definitive.

Pattiann Rogers, from “God Alone”
Photography Credit David Wilson

Readers may be divided into four classes:
1) Sponges, who absorb all that they read and return it in nearly the same state, only a little dirtied.
2) Sand-glasses, who retain nothing and are content to get through a book for the sake of getting through the time.
3) Strain-bags, who retain merely the dregs of what they read.
4) Mogul diamonds, equally rare and valuable, who profit by what they read, and enable others to profit by it also

—Samuel Taylor Coleridge (via wordpainting)

nprfreshair:

Paul Nelson’s Aviary series:
PetaPixel:

Shot in partnership with Springbook Nature Center, the photo series captures beautiful studio-style portraits of birds taking flight as they’re released back into the wild.

via Matthias Rascher

We hear and see a lot more birds now that we’re living in Marfa.  Steve had a phone call the other day, and his NY colleagues asked, “Are you living in an aviary?”

nprfreshair:

Paul Nelson’s Aviary series:

PetaPixel:

Shot in partnership with Springbook Nature Center, the photo series captures beautiful studio-style portraits of birds taking flight as they’re released back into the wild.

via Matthias Rascher

We hear and see a lot more birds now that we’re living in Marfa.  Steve had a phone call the other day, and his NY colleagues asked, “Are you living in an aviary?”

A book is a blunt instrument and a block of eternity. It’s the physical manifestation of boredom. A book. ‘The book.’ Students never call it anything else in their essays: the book, a book, the books, some books.

The Rights of the Reader by Daniel Pennac (translated by Sarah Adams). On a tip from a discussion about readers’ advisory on the RUSA listerv, I picked up The Rights of the ReaderThe titular rights are illustrated in this poster by Quentin Blake, if you want to check them out. But I think the essay beforehand is the best part, actually. (1/3)

(Source: bookavore)

unicorn-meat-is-too-mainstream:

PASSENGER

Brandon Vickerds ‘Passenger’ and ‘Passenger II’ are deliberately placed in busy areas in Montreal, QC and Hamilton, ON. The hurrying passer-by probably won’t notice the difference between the sculpture and an actual person, but Vickerds inention concerning his public sculptures is not to reveal them as sculptures immediately, but seeks ‘to insert an anomaly into the viewer’s experience of the everyday’.

Thought this might inspire some horror poetry, Lucia, because I’ve decided that is a thing.  —Claire

I remember the joy of studying in the library at SLC.  I used to try and find deserted alcoves where students were unlikely to go.  A couple Genetic Counseling students and I dubbed one The Wombat Den for some reason.
In undergrad, my favorite spot was an old desk upstairs in a corner dedicated to an alum whose name I can’t remember.  I would come with a backpack full of books and end up browsing in the sci-fi section instead.  I later found out that this was the spot where students went to the library to make out, not study.  I never had this experience myself—it was just me, my laptop, and classic sci-fi.  Pure bliss.  
—Claire

I remember the joy of studying in the library at SLC.  I used to try and find deserted alcoves where students were unlikely to go.  A couple Genetic Counseling students and I dubbed one The Wombat Den for some reason.

In undergrad, my favorite spot was an old desk upstairs in a corner dedicated to an alum whose name I can’t remember.  I would come with a backpack full of books and end up browsing in the sci-fi section instead.  I later found out that this was the spot where students went to the library to make out, not study.  I never had this experience myself—it was just me, my laptop, and classic sci-fi.  Pure bliss. 

—Claire

(via prettybooks)